I would not be comfortable with merging this into headinganchors and enabling it by default for two main reasons:

  • it adds a new dependency on Text::Unidecode
  • Text::Unidecode specifically documents its transliteration as not being stable across versions

There are several "slugify" libraries available other than Text::Unidecode. It isn't clear to me which one is the best. Pandoc also documents an algorithm for generating slugs, and it would be nice if our fallback implementation (with i18n disabled) was compatible with Pandoc's, at least for English text.

However! In HTML5, IDs are allowed to contain anything except space characters (space, newline, tab, CR, FF), so we could consider just passing non-ASCII through the algorithm untouched. This example link to a Russian anchor name (the output of putting "example" into English-to-Russian Google Translate) hopefully works? (Use a small browser window to make it clearer where it goes)

Can we assume Ikiwiki generates HTML5 all the time? I thought that was still a setting off by default... --anarcat

ikiwiki always generates HTML5, since 3.20150107. The html5 option has been repurposed to control whether we generate new-in-HTML5 semantic markup like <section> and <nav> (html5 enabled), or HTML4 equivalents like <div> with a class (html5 disabled). The default is still off, although I should probably either toggle it to on or remove the option altogether in the next release. --s

So perhaps we could try this Unicode-aware version of what Pandoc documents:

  • Remove footnote links if any (this might have to be heuristic, or we could skip this step for a first implementation)
  • Take only the plain text, no markup (passing the heading through HTML::Parser and collecting only the text nodes would be the fully-correct version of this, or we could fake it with regexes and be at least mostly correct)
  • Strip punctuation, using some Unicode-aware definition of what is punctuation: perhaps s/[^-\w_. ]//gu; (delete anything that is not a (Unicode-aware) word character, hyphen-minus, underscore, dot or space)
  • Replace spaces with hyphen-minus
  • Force to lower-case with lc
  • Strip leading digits and punctuation
  • If the string is empty, use section
  • If we already generated a matching identifier, append -1, -2, etc. until we find an unused identifier

(Or to provide better uniqueness, we could parse the document looking for any existing ID, then append -1, -2 to each generated ID until there is no collision.)

This would give us, for example, ## Visiting 北京id="visiting-北京" (whereas Text::Unidecode would instead transliterate, resulting in id="visiting-bei-jing").

To use these IDs in fragments, I would be inclined to rely on browsers supporting IRIs: <a href="#visiting-北京">.

--smcv

I guess this makes sense. I just wonder how well this is actually supported in all browsers.. I looked around and suspect this will work in more recent browsers, but, as an example, https://caniuse.com/ doesn't have that feature listed in their tables. :) -- anarcat

That might well indicate that all major browsers have always supported it so there is no need to check. I don't see any particular reason why a browser vendor would not want to accept arbitrary non-whitespace as a valid anchor.

In practice, minor or old browsers are probably insecure anyway, so I don't care too much about supporting them perfectly... --s


Documentation says:

Also note that all heading attributes are overriden with the ID tag. If this is not desirable, we'd need to fire up a full HTML::Parser or do some more regex magic to preserve the attributes other than id= which we want to keep.

I think this is a bug, particularly if you are using Pandoc's header attributes or similar.

It's not a bug, it's a limitation. :) But sure, it's a thing. It's an issue in headinganchors as well of course. -- anarcat

No, current/historical headinganchors has a different bug: it ignores headings that have any attributes, and does not generate anchors for them. That gives it degraded functionality, but no information loss. I think that's less bad. --s

I think we should try to use an existing ID before generating our own, with the generation step as a fallback, just like Pandoc does. If a htmlize layer like Text::MultiMarkdown or Pandoc is generating worse IDs than this plugin, the the right solution to that is to send a bug report / feature request to make its IDs as good as this plugin's, or turn off ID generation in the htmlize layer, or stop using Text::MultiMarkdown.

--smcv

Agreed. However, the situation I was in was that multimarkdown and the headinganchors plugins had issues I had to fix. So it was better and easier for me to just override whatever attributes were there for testing and fixing this in the short term... -- anarcat


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Example fragment ID in Russian should point here
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This works for me on Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:50.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/50.0 on Debian stretch, FWIW. --anarcat